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of syria. nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel and his crew disappeared thursday after crossing into northwest syria from turkey. this morning he told the "today" show how they were all finally set free. >> at the end of this, we were being moved to yet another location in the later around 11:00 last night local time and as we were moving along the road the kidnappers came across a rebel checkpoint, something they hadn't expected so we were in the back of what you'd think of as a mini van and as we were driving along the road the kidnappers saw this checkpoint, started a gun fight with it. two of the kidnappers were killed, they climbed out of the vehicle and the rebels took us. we spent the night with them, we didn't get much sleep. >> ivan watson joins us from istanbul, turkey. ivan, who were these kidnappers and why did they take me see journalists? >> well, according to richard engel's statement this was a shabiha pro-government militia made up of shiite muslims and it gives you a sense of how chaotic the situation has gotten inside syria. we were hearing about clashes betwe
. >> nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in syria to bring us the latest on what is a developing story. richard? >> reporter: david, despite increasing criticism and warnings, the government of bashir al assad is revving up its activities. this area was bombed last night. regarding chemical weapons, commanders we have spoken to are very concerned that the government could use chemical weapons. they are completely not prepared for that eventuality. they don't have gas masks. they don't have medicine. there's no early warning system here. they have appealed for some kind of training, but so far on the ground there is nothing that could protect them from any kind of deadly chemical weapon that could be used. they are also, rebel commanders we have spoken to, not very encouraged by what they are hearing from president obama. they don't think that these kind of warnings of unspecified consequences will make any difference on the ground. they say the white house and president obama has warned the government not to attack civilians, yet civilians have been attacked. they
correspondent richard engel and his crew were freed overnight after a fire fight in syria. they had been kidnapped and held for five days by a group they say was loyal to the syrian government. this morning on the "today" show, richard spoke a little about the ordeal. >> they kept us blindfolded, bound. we weren't physically beaten or tortured. it was a lot of psychological torture, threats of being killed. they made us choose which one of us would be shot first and when we refused, there were mock shootin shootings. >> richard engel and his two colleagues are safely out of syria, a bright spot of news during this difficult week. stay with us, the days "top lines" are coming up. when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're re
, richard engel, is safe, and harmed at now out of the country. the network says they disappeared shortly after crossing into northwest syria from turkey on thursday. he is says that they were finally freed monday a fire fight at a checkpoint manned by rebel fighters, which they ran into as they were being moved. nbc says that while the crew was missing, there was no claim of responsibility, no contact with the capers and no request for ransom. >> hawaii's senator daniel enna-way has died. he died of respiratory complications and washington area hospitals. if the 88 year old was the longest serving senator. he spent 50 years in the senate and was a medal of honor recipient. according to be in na wheys office his last word was " aloha". >> we will be right back. >> in the wake of the deadly connecticut elementary school shooting, we are hearing more stories of courage and heroism. gene rosen lives near the school in newtown. friday morning, before anyone knew what had happened, he discovered six terrified children in a school bus driver on the front lawn. it rosen invited them into his hom
tale, a reporter and his crew held for five days in syria, now free unharmed. nbc says richard engel and his crew, safe and out of the country. nick paton walsh following this story. a dramatic series of event. >> engel's crew crossed into syria on thursday. nothing was heard. no ransom request, no contact. until they appeared to be free on monday. subsequently emerges, they were picked up, mr. engel says, by a men in ski masks. 15 of them, who leapt out of the bushes and took his team as hostages. they were moved around the country in the back of an open pickup, blind folded and bound, but otherwise not harmed. they were transferred to another location. this all happening in the north of syria. now, during that journey, they seem to have come across a group of rebels called the atar al sham brigade, who entered into a gun fight with their captors. it caused the nbc team to be free. >> no physical harm. but psychological farm. fa harm. fake executions, asking them which one of them they would like to be executed first. >> they believe that there was a reb regime to the loyalty. mr. e
mohamed morsi. we're live in cairo with richard engel. richard, good morning. >> good morning, jenna. this country is divided. the mood is tense. competing demonstrations here in cairo today. here in tahrir square, they are against president mohamed morsi, saying that he has become a dictator and is trying to rush through a constitution that allows for too much islamic law. but in a sense of the way the winds are blowing here, the crowds here are small and somewhat subdued. compare that to across the nile river, in front of cairo university, where tens of thousands of morsi supporters are gathered. they want more islamic law. they want morsi to be a strong president. so egypt can get out of its political deadlock. neither side is backing down. and egypt appears to be at a cross roads. >> richard engel. richard, thank you very much. >>> north korea says it will launch a long range rocket this month. the defiant move set for december 10th through 22nd is likely to heighten already strained tensions with washington and with seoul and it comes just eight months after a failed april attem
, traveling with rebels. at one point more than a dozen armed gunmen, richard engel, said ambushed them and took them into custody, threw them in the back of a pickup truck and drove them to a location. they were blindfolded. they were bound for several days. they were subjected to mock executions. they went through really a terrible time. and this is part of what richard told his colleagues on the "today" show, a few hours ago, about what they went through while they were in captivity. let's listen. >> and they took us to a series of safe houses and interrogation places. and they kept us blindfolded, bound. we weren't physically beaten or tortured. it was a lot of psychological torture. threats of being killed. they made us choose which one of us would be shot first. when we refused, there were mock shootings. they pretended to shoot ghazi several times. when you're blindfolded, and then they fired the gun up in the air. it can be very traumatic experience. and at end of this, we were being moved to yet another location in the -- around 11:00 last night local time. and as we were movin
correspondent richard engel was able to travel inside. a rare report. >> reporter: in parts of syria that are controlled by the rebels, there's no talk of the diplomatic efforts to find a peaceful solution. the trips and meetings of hillary clinton with the u.n. and her russian counterpart, there's no hope here for a diplomatic solution. instead, what people talk about is the suffering of the people. the people are showing tremendous resilience. this house was bombed by mistake. the people who lived here lived next to a rebel commander. now they're homeless. there is also tremendous economic difficulties here. the syrian currency is worth about half of what it was worth when the war began. a loaf of bread costs 20 time what is it did just a few months ago. despite all of this, the rebels are making advances. they say they will -- they hope to soon control the city of aleppo, the country's commercial capital. after that, damascus. richard engel, on the outskirts of aleppo. >> you both just saw richard's report. aaron, let me start with you. how real, at this point, is the fear that ba
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)